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Dust Plume Headed to South Florida

dust plume
Sahara dust plume Courtesy: NOAA

(Undated) — The Sahara dust plume is making its way across the Atlantic ocean to the U.S. The dust plume from the Sahara desert will arrive in the Southeastern parts of the country mid-week. Experts say dust plumes aren’t uncommon, but most of the time they dissipate over the Atlantic and don’t make their way to the states.
Fortunately the dusk cloud prevents the formation of hurricanes.

In a tweet, the National Weather Service (NWS) Houston/Galveston TX said dusty weather could be possible as a result of the cloud, which would be moving into the state’s southeast on Tuesday. “If this dust reaches the area we should expect some red skies at sunrise and sunset for a few days and probably drier weather as well,” it said.

People may notice a difference in the appearance of the sky, more intense allergies, and less hurricane watch areas along the coast.

The cloud of dust is the result of atmospheric conditions in the Sahara at this time of year. According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the Saharan Air Layer is a mass of extremely dry dusty air that forms over the desert between late spring and early fall. It normally forms a layer in the atmosphere that is around two miles thick and sits around one mile above the surface. It can cover an area about the size of the lower 48 states and at peak periods, the layer can reach as far as the U.S. southeast coast.