Featured Stories | Storm Central

Cold Front Blows Thru on Last Day of Atlantic Hurricane Season

Get out your coats and boots as the sunshine state is going to cool off over the next few days.
A cold front moving through today, Monday, Nov. 30., which is also the final day of the Atlantic Hurricane Season.
We will see lows in the 50’s and 40’s overnight and highs in the 60’s tomorrow. Then temperatures will be back into the mid 70’s on Wednesday and Thursday.

A subtropical depression or storm could form in the northeast Atlantic as the season ends.
The last time the Atlantic had a storm in December was in 2013.
Hurricane season officially ends on Monday, but the Atlantic might produce another depression or named storm as we head into the month of December.

Officially, the Atlantic hurricane season runs from June 1 through Nov. 30. That time frame was selected to encompass 97% of all Atlantic tropical storms and hurricanes, according to NOAA’s Hurricane Research Division.

A small number of tropical storms and even hurricanes have occurred outside that six-month time period, primarily in May and December, but also in every other month outside of hurricane season.

This December has a chance to start out with a subtropical depression or storm in the far northeast Atlantic.

Officially, the Atlantic hurricane season runs from June 1 through Nov. 30. That time frame was selected to encompass 97% of all Atlantic tropical storms and hurricanes, according to NOAA’s Hurricane Research Division.

South Florida was spared any major hurricane strikes. Tropical Storm Eta hit South Florida on Sunday, November 8th and caused major flooding.

The system hit as a strong tropical storm in the Florida Keys around 11 p.m. with wind speeds of 65 mph and slowly moved through the region, drenching South Florida and causing flash flooding in large cities such as Miami and Fort Lauderdale.

Nearly a foot and a half of rain fell in eastern portions of Broward County, north of Miami. More than 14 inches of rain fell near Hollywood, and parts of the Miami metro area received more than 6 inches of rain, according to the National Weather Service.

Eta has broken a record as the 12th named storm to make landfall in the continental U.S. in a single season. The previous record was nine named storms in 1916.

In addition, the last time a named storm made landfall in Florida in the month of November was Tropical Storm Mitch in 1998.