Cleanup Efforts Resume in Bahamas as Humberto Moves Away

Personal items and debris lay scattered in the extensive damage and destruction in the aftermath of Hurricane Dorian, in The Mudd, Great Abaco, Bahamas, Thursday, Sept. 5, 2019. The Mudd was built by thousands of Haitian migrants over decades. It was razed in a matter of hours by Dorian, which reduced it to piles of splintered plywood and two-by-fours 4 and 5 feet deep, spread over an area equal to several football fields. (AP Photo/Gonzalo Gaudenzi)

Tropical Storm Humberto narrowly missed the Abaco and Grand Bahama islands, which are just beginning the recovery process after taking a devastating hit from Hurricane Dorian earlier this month.

By 11 a.m. Sunday, the National Hurricane Center said Humberto was located about 180 miles north-northwest of Great Abaco Island and was moving at 7 mph to the north with maximum sustained winds of 65 mph.

The NHC believes the storm will likely become a hurricane by Sunday night, but should remain far from the Bahamas and the U.S. coast by that time.

However, Humberto briefly caused the closure of small airports in the Bahamas, and sent people in already damaged homes to seek shelter yet again, temporarily interrupting the distribution of needed supplies, including food and water.

As the storm passed, residents and officials resumed their Hurricane Dorian cleanup and recovery efforts.

U.N. Secretary-General Antonio Guterres visited Great Abaco on Saturday to support the ongoing humanitarian efforts. He says, “Hurricane Dorian has been classified as Category 5. I think it’s Category Hell,” adding that he is horrified by the “level of systematic devastation.”

The islands’ official death toll from Dorian remains at 50, and another 1,300 are still reported missing. However, officials say the list is preliminary, and some people may just be unable to connect with their loved ones.

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